Picasso’s self-portraits are important because they span his entire career, and we can trace how his manner of self-depiction changed over time. It

Picasso’s self portrait evolution from age 15 to age 90

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2022-05-14 20:00:16

Picasso’s self-portraits are important because they span his entire career, and we can trace how his manner of self-depiction changed over time.

It’s interesting to compare the self-portraits from, for instance, the Blue Period to those done when he was working in a Cubist mode only a few years later. In a way, his self-portraits reflect different periods of his artistic maturity and art career.

He once noted, “The different styles I have been using in my art must not be seen as an evolution, or as steps towards an unknown ideal of painting… “

In another comment, he said, “Different themes inevitably require different methods of expression. This does not imply either evolution or progress; it is a matter of following the idea one wants to express and the way in which one wants to express it.”

Picasso’s work is often categorized into periods. While the names of many of his later periods are debated, the most commonly accepted periods in his work are the Blue Period (1901–1904), the Rose Period (1904–1906), the African-influenced Period (1907–1909), Analytic Cubism (1909–1912), and Synthetic Cubism (1912–1919), also referred to as the Crystal period.

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