Proportional fonts are everywhere. Whether you’re reading a magazine, browsing a website or looking at a news paper from the 18th century, the l

The case for proportional programming fonts

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Style Pass
2023-11-19 20:00:06

Proportional fonts are everywhere. Whether you’re reading a magazine, browsing a website or looking at a news paper from the 18th century, the letters that make up the words are varying in width making for a pleasant reading experience and nice aesthetic. Early computers broke with this convention; on early video adapters and printers it was easier to align text in a columnar grid of equally wide glyphs. While most of the computer world long abandoned this concept with the introduction of graphic user interfaces, most of the programming community stuck with this monospaced grid of letters. The past decade has seen countless of interesting typefaces dedicated to programming, but almost all of them stuck with the monospace proportions. Instead of wondering why, first let me illustrate the difference.

Nothing out of the ordinary here. The text looks great and the indentation on the left hand side has not lost any semantic meaning.

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