We wrote last week that Microsoft’s new Flight Simulator release has taken off in a really big way. The reviews up to this point paint a favorable p

Microsoft’s Flight Simulator can Drive $2.6 Billion To PC Hardware Sales

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2020-08-24 18:25:08

We wrote last week that Microsoft’s new Flight Simulator release has taken off in a really big way. The reviews up to this point paint a favorable picture of the new game (or should we call it a simulator?), and after having played it ourselves, we totally get why. The game is captivating, due to its realistic representation of the earth, and obviously, the realistic physics and aircraft characteristics.

If you’ve played the new Flight Simulator yourself, you’re probably aware that things are not exactly perfect right now. In all of our “testing” (read: playing), we experienced the game crashing to the desktop on a handful of occasions, and beyond that, the frame rate we see on certain configurations doesn’t seem to add up. In effect, hitting 60 FPS at a higher resolution, like 3440×1440 or 4K, will not happen if you plan to use a top-end GPU and top-end graphics settings.

That’s no doubt part of the reason Jon Peddie Research sees such enormous potential with regards to future PC hardware sales made as a direct result of this game. Flight simulators have long been showcases for pushing PC hardware – not just the GPU, but also the CPU. We used Flight Simulator X way back in 2008 to test Intel’s eight-core Skulltrail platform. Today, you’d imagine the potential to effectively use modern hardware would be even greater.

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