It’s the 60s. You’re sitting in a red-walled, smoke-filled boozer, when you hear a conversation that pricks your ears up. The details so

Scammers Are Teaching the Art of Fraud on TikTok

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2022-05-13 22:00:13

It’s the 60s. You’re sitting in a red-walled, smoke-filled boozer, when you hear a conversation that pricks your ears up. The details sound legally dubious, but they flash a watch that looks too nice for the spot you’re in. You decide to learn more.

This is not a new story, but with the introduction of cash-flaunting social media clips, there is a new chapter. It’s called ScamTok. 

If you’re yet to visit TikTok’s grift-centred universe, finding it isn’t difficult. Hashtags include: #fraud, #cashout, #scamming, #scammers, #scamtutorial, #scamtock. You get the idea.

Fire the terms into the search bar and you’ll land on clips directing viewers toward scamming methods. Think: frosted glass blurring over juicy deets (the bank balance, codes and credit card numbers), then a plug for a Snapchat or Telegram account to contact, away from the app. 

Generally published by accounts with a handful of posts and followers, ScamTok clips cover a range of outcomes. Want to get a COVID pass added to your NHS app? A video soundtracked by UK drill act Central Cee offers to do it in return for £350. Would you like easy money? Another clip, plastered with the text “Welcome to scam tok” advises users to hit the poster up directly.

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