At first, designers loved the modern and clean aesthetic that neumorphism (also known as neomorphism) offered. They embraced the glossy minimalism and

The rise and fall of neumorphism

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Style Pass
2022-06-23 12:00:10

At first, designers loved the modern and clean aesthetic that neumorphism (also known as neomorphism) offered. They embraced the glossy minimalism and simple embedded UI elements. Neumorphic elements felt like they’d been shaped out of polished material, mimicking tactile shapes and real world textures with a subtle blend of light, shadows, and curves. 

But the soft edges and airy designs characteristic of neumorphism seemed to fall out of favor as quickly as they fell into it. 

To understand this rapid change, let’s step back and discuss where neumorphism came from and what made this design trend gain and lose appeal so quickly. 

Neumorphism isn’t the first design style to emulate 3D and material textures. We can trace neumorphism back to skeuomorphism, which also attempted to mimic the physical world.

Skeuomorphic design rose to prominence in the mid 90s. The idea was to make navigating the digital world and internet feel familiar through its use of 3D and objects from everyday life. 

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