When I was younger, I used to play a Korean MMORPG called Ragnarok. In it, everyone starts off as a novice, then at level 10 you choose a tier 1 class

Progressing as a Software Engineer

submited by
Style Pass
2022-06-21 20:00:04

When I was younger, I used to play a Korean MMORPG called Ragnarok. In it, everyone starts off as a novice, then at level 10 you choose a tier 1 class, like swordsman, then at a certain level you choose a tier 2 class, like knight, and it goes up to tier 4 or something now (it ended at tier 2 when I played, but they've added on since then). So why do I bring it up? Well I think most people think of a software engineer's career path in terms of these kinds of tiers.

At first, everyone starts off as a novice, then most people will begin to specialize in one or a couple of different things (tier 1/senior engineer), then you come to the first major fork in the road at tier 2 (every tier 1 class has a choice of picking between two different tier 2 classes) where you basically decide if you transition to management or technical progression (the former meaning becoming team lead or equivalent and the latter meaning becoming the go-to technical problem solver, which I don't know the title of). You can extrapolate for the rest of the tiers, and of course people can switch between them, but it's just a metaphor so it's not perfect.

Maybe this way of thinking of it is wrong though. My whole professional career is unconventional, so I can't really relate to the metaphor. Instead, I've found that it's more appropriate to think of it in terms of what kind code you're writing and your productive output measured in human power (HP), where one human power is one mostly fluent engineer working on something.

Leave a Comment