Lately, it seems popular to talk smack about React. Both the orange and red site recently spilled the tea about how mean Uncle React has been, and how

Hackery, Math &  Design

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2022-09-24 03:30:23

Lately, it seems popular to talk smack about React. Both the orange and red site recently spilled the tea about how mean Uncle React has been, and how much nicer some of these next-gen frameworks supposedly are.

Now, before you close this tab thinking "ugh, not another tech rant", let me first remind you that a post is not a rant simply because it makes you angry. Next, let me point out that I've been writing code for 32 years. You should listen to your elders, for they know shit and have seen shit. I've also spent a fair amount of time teaching people how to get really good at React, so I know the pitfalls.

You may also notice that not even venerated 3rd party developers are particularly excited about React 18 and its concurrent mode, let alone the unwashed masses. This should tell you the React team itself is suffering a bit of an existential crisis. The framework that started as just the V in MVC can't seem to figure out where it wants to go.

So this is not the praise of a React fanboy. I built my own clone of the core run-time, and it was exactly because its limitations were grating, despite the potential there. I added numerous extensions, and then used it to tackle one of the most challenging domains around: GPU rendering. If one person can pull that off, that means there's actually something real going on here. It ties into genuine productivity boons, and results in robust, quality software, which seems to come together as if by magic.

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